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Language warning.

The song you’re about to hear might offend you.

“I got killers with the deuce-deuce, them Tan Boys my niggas They gon’ ride with me too, bust they nines with me too That’s my bilingual crew, who do sign language true Bandannas in they pockets, how the f*#k we gon’ lose?”

That was A$AP Ferg’s ‘Dump Dump’ off the album ‘Trap Lord’, which debuted at number 9 on the Billboard 200.

So plenty of people had no problem with it.

But what would you think if you heard a bunch of white kids singing that?

That’s exactly what happened in — of all places — the exclusive Brentwood School in L.A.

Listen to this recording — posted on YouTube Monday by a group called “Brentwood Students Against Racism.”

“I f***ed your bitch, n***a, I***ed your bitch.

I f***ed your bitch, n***a, I f***ed your bitch She suck my d**k, n***a, she suck my d**k.”

That’s language you probably wouldn’t want your grandmother to hear.

Unless your grandmother is the white frat house mom at the University of Oklahoma who famously sang along to Trinidad James’ ‘All Gold Everything’ — n-word and all.

“N***a, N***a, N***a……”

Now we can disagree over the use of the n-word.

We can disagree over who gets to say it and who doesn’t.

Context obviously has a lot to do with it.

Former slugger Barry Bonds, whose daughter is a student at the Brentwood School, was outraged when he saw the video of those white students singing ‘Dump Dump’.

School officials told TMZ they think the video is offensive and they’re investigating.

But here’s the thing.

When artists release songs… songs they hope people will buy and sing along to … should we really be blaming the kids for doing exactly that?

In 2014 I gave an editorial on this program titled “If You Want People like Justin Bieber to Stop Using [the N-Word], Shouldn’t You Do The Same?

It garnered a lot of headlines and criticism from people who used pretzel logic to conclude that I had blamed black folks for white people using the word.

It was the dumbest thing I had ever heard.

Songs, like poems are meant to be catchy, to be hummed, to be sung to be bought by the masses – That’s the big idea behind them.

Can we really blame people of any color for singing a popular song?

If we don’t want them to use a certain word perhaps you should stop writing it, saying it or singing it on a song.

I’m just saying.

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