Wendy Wright

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            The general topic of attractiveness is important to members of virtually every culture, especially to the young who seek romantic partners and to those who seek to extend their influence in society through contact with others. Attractiveness is significant to each individual and to most people whom the person meets, and the effects of attractiveness could extend to virtually every other impression a person makes. Attractiveness to a psychologist means how others perceive and rate the desireability of a person’s features. Such ratings or opinions depend partly on inherent physical attractiveness of the facial features and partly on other factors, for example, how these features are “packaged” or presented.

But are there universal standards of attractiveness, and do black women in particular fall short of these standards?

According to evolutionary psychologist Dr. Satoshi Kanazawa, there is a set of data which shows black women to be “objectively” less attractive than white, Asian or Native American women, but that the same data does not find black men less attractive than men of other races. Kanazawa accepts this data and then tries to explain why it is the case. He suggests that black people have more testosterone than other races, and so possess “more masculine features.” He states too that women are “objectively” more attractive than men, so if black women have more masculine features, this explains why they are rated less attractive. Is there any truth to his assertion?

Join Wendy Wright and psycholgical anthropologist, Dr. James Donovan this Saturday at 1pm ET for an objective look at the psychological mechanisms underlying attractiveness judgments. Talk just got interesting!

Wright On The Edge, Saturday from 1-3pm on WOL and streaming live at woldcnews.com

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